Is blogging still relevant to journalism?

That’s one of many questions I’m pondering as I start work on the third edition of Journalism Next. If you are a professor who has chosen to use the text in your class, or a young journalist who experienced the book in college (whether it was your choice or not), I’d love to get your feedback.

In looking at the chapter topics, I’m wondering if I need to include a separate chapter on blogging in the next edition? Is that still relevant? I don’t want to waste time trying to define “blog” in comparison to other news sites. And, as I learned this weekend at the ISOJ conference in Austin, there are actually still journalists and academics struggling with the fact that blogs exist! (“Some people just can’t over the fact anybody can say any damn thing on the Internet,” quipped Jay Rosen.)

What about a basic understanding of how the web works? Still needed in 2014? Or audio? Is that helpful for students to learn? (I had one professor tell me yesterday that, yes, it is.)

Below is a list of chapter topics from the second edition of Journalism Next. If you would take a minute and give it a look, then let me know what should be in the third edition (due out next year) and what can be “retired” I would be forever grateful.

1. How the web works
2. Blogging for better journalism
3. Crowd-powered collaboration
4. Microblogging and social media
5. Going mobile
6. Visual storytelling with photographs
7. Making audio journalism visible
8. Telling stories with video
9. Data-driven journalism and digitizing your life
10. Managing news as a conversation
11. Building a digital audience for news

Email me at mark@journalism20.com and share your insight. (UPDATE: There’s a technical glitch with comments on this post so I have turned them off until I can find and fix the problem.)

Much appreciated.

 

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